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do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
. the euphoria of re-election is quickly giving way to hard reality of governing with the foreign policy crisis bubbling from iran to syria. plus, lingering questions about the terror attack in benghazi, which will result in those three different house and senate committees, grilling administration officials next thursday. >> hopefully now that we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did notch they claim to be the most pope and transparent administration ever but they are not going the basics in sharing with congress this basic information. >> one of the three panels the house foreign affairs committee invited secretary of state hillary clinton to testify about the terror attack for the first time. >> we are very committed to working with the congress throughout the process. >> on the domestic front second term issues are as thorny, with the president pushing for bipartisan deal on immigration reform and that eluded several predecessors. his campaign manager conducted the time conference call of the election season today and did a victo
in the christian conservative community. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> we are still looking at a post-election survey that we commissioned, that we got this morning about 5:00 a.m., but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i have seen throughout my career. there is a tendency to caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and suggest that they live in trailer parks and are poor and uneducated and easy to command. they cling to their guns and religion and vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs to the exact same percentage the rest of the electorate. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the just and unjust alike. they are also struggling with their mortgages and figuring out how to put their kids through school. they voted to a large part on the economy and jobs. you look at issues like same-sex marriage and abortion, and it was about 10% of what drove. i think what you
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evident by the remotely standing crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president, transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the are presidential cycle to impact the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where as necessary, seeks con fir nation, goes through reassessment, definition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrates to the changes, or as people say, the lack of changes, here in washington. at t
still, president obama, i think, has been cautious with foreign policy, we have a divided government, and we have to take care of the fiscal cliff that's looming, and that's the first order of business. not making any predigses, but i think it's just useful to see where we are, and i think the election results do have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in the report. i'll turn it over to peter, manuel, and margaret for their summary remarks. >> thank you. great introduction. let me start, and, in fact, i want to focus on the visit at the end of the month which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election has had any keep of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america thinks about the u.s.. it's an important meeting for both presidents k become somewhat routine now for the president-elect of mexico to come toñ&r the united states bee the inauguration. calderÓn did, and i don't remember back further, but -- >> [inaudible] >> i was too young then. [laughter] in any event, the visit,
programs aimed at raising federal revenues. >>> pakistan remains one of the biggest foreign policy headaches for re-elected president obama. his second term will oversee the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan, scheduled to be complete by the end of 2014. nhk world's hideki yui outlines the challenges those two countries pose for obama's next term. >> reporter: afghanistan and pakistan are two nations affected by the u.s. fight against terrorism. both expect the obama administration to shift its focus during a second term to rebuilding the economy back home. at the height of the u.s. deployment, about 100,000 american troops were stationed in afghanistan. the number has fallen to less than 70,000, and further reductions are planned. many in afghanistan welcome that trend, but others voice concern that it could throw the unstable country back into civil war. dialogue between the united states and the taliban was suspended earlier this year. during the election campaign, obama distanced himself from the issue to avoid being branded weak on terrorism. with the election b
-- institute. i'm delighted to see all of you today. i think the interest in foreign policy and the wake of our presidential election is evident by the standing room only crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle that may have an impact on the policy process. so, i take it that it is a good sign that there is a much interest in the foreign-policy process by your presence here today. i think the transition from a first to second on the administration may begin the day after election, but it does not end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the new old team goes through the inevitable time of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, but fiscal cliff for example, and packed for policy. let's not forget, as the world rick roberts to the changes -- or some people get -- some people say, a lack of changes -- here in washington. let's not forget that hist
the second-term challenges and then foreign policy including the situation in syria and iran and the latest fallout from benghazi ed henry is live at the white house. a lot of challenges from abroad. >>reporter: you talk about the fiscal cliff, they have that and after what has been happening with syria and that is play out with violence on the ground. assad will not give in. the euphoria from tuesday night, you talk to people inside the white house, they knew that is evaporating and we have to get down to business so today the president got a stream of calls from world leaders, including from the u.k., and david cameron, and binyamin netanyahu from israel, as well, congratulations, but, also, in doubt the phone calls, a lot of business being conducted with the president realizing particularly in the middle east there is a lot of major problems to confront. i am told by senior officials before election day the chief of staff, jack lou and others have been meeting and planning and if the president were re-elected they would have to hit the ground running on domestic issues and foreign policy
of sanctions against iran, its first foreign policy initiative since tuesday's election. the 2012 election has officially come to a close after a final vote count confirmed president obama won the state of florida. there romney's campaign conceded florida on thursday with obama ahead by over 58,000 votes. obama's final electoral college tally was 332 votes to romney's 206. video has been released a president obama breaking into tears as he thanks workers and volunteers at his chicago campaign headquarters. obama made the visit the day after he won reelection. >> even before last night's results, i felt the the work i had done in running for office had come full circle because you guys -- [indiscernible] i am really proud of that. i am proud of all of you. and what you have -- [applause] >> president obama is expected to deliver his first address since his victory speech later today with a statement on the economy. topping up in his post-election domestic agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff of $700 billion in expiring tax cuts and automatic spending reductions set to take effect at the end of
.i.a. then former senator evan bayh on the fiscal cliff. then senior editor of foreign policy magazine will be on. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post,"
sadloff and delighted to see you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evidence by the standing remotely crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, a transition even with the same president, transitions are the most flute and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for sometime. as the president's new or old team takes shape, and where necessary, seeks confirmation, as the new old team goes through the inevidentble period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and not forget as the world recalibrates changes or
an audience. you know, when you are the president's foreign policy spokesman and you are hanging out and have the israeli prime minister and then the chairman trying to reach a middle east peace, you go, okay, what we tell the press? and you say, you can tell them whatever you want except for this and that. and what else is there? [laughter] but now we have dennis ross was out of government. and he is writing a new book. when you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with iran, whether the nuclear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. in 2009 when you were at the state department as the special envoy forswore wrong, there was a strategy of both engagement and pressure. going back to 2009 there is the engagement that has continued at a certain level through the five plus one process, but then there has been focused over the last couple of years on pressure sanctions and the 40% drop in iranian currency shows that we now have the pressure of the last couple
control. president obama, i think, has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy. we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff that is looming, and that is the first order of business. not making any predictions, but i think it is just useful to see where we are and i do think the election results to have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in this report. i will turn it over to peter and then market and manuel. >> thank you. a good introduction. let me start -- i want to focus on the opinion yet to visit at the end of this month, which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america is thinking about the u.s.. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now with the president elect of mexico to come to the u.s. before the inauguration. calderÓn did, foxx did. i do not remember back farther than that, but anyhow -- i wa
not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater threats to our closest allies and to ourselves? unfortunately, that's what we're seeing. in fact, i had seen an article in may of 2010 that indicated that this administration, the obama administration, sided with israel's enemies in demanding that israel disclose any nuclear weapons. we had never sided with israel's enemies in trying to push israel into doing something against its own interests. when you're a very small country surrounded by countries that want to see you go away, it is important that they not know all of your defenses. going back in the old testament, you find history, king his kaija -- king hezekiah showing all the defenses they had in their armory he showed them to the leaders from babylon. as a resu
has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy and we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff for swimming and that's not making any predictions, but it's just useful to see where we are and the election results do have implications for some of the concerns we outlined in this report. i think i'll turn it over to computer for remarks. >> michael, good introduction. let me start -- in fact, i went to showcase the end of this month. it will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about that america was the way that lack america is thinking about the u.s. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now that the president elect of mexico to come to the united states before the inauguration. calderon did, fox did. i don't remember back further than that, but i was too young then. in any event, the visit itself opens up just a huge number of opportunities that probably existed -- i d
, economic, and fiscal issues. host: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. that has been one caution. the next step would be considering some kind of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran pose a nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's la
: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. so that has been one caution. then the next step would likely be considering some sort of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran's nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's lap. it is probably strategically
of the years, never before an audience. [laughter] when you are the president's foreign-policy spokesman and handing out in the roosevelt room as you have the israeli prime minister and then chairman arafat and the president trying to reach middle east piece you go and say, okay. but we tell the press. look, you can tell them what everyone except for this, this, and this. what else is there? but now we have the dennis two is out of the government. and writing a new book. so if you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with ron, then the clear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those, if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. so start off, in 2009 when you were at the state department's as the special envoy for ron there was a strategy, both engagement. go back to 2009. the engagement has continued at a certain level, but then there has been the focus over the last couple of years on pressure, sanctions, and clearly the 40% drop in the value of a running currencies shows that actually is having t
won, you have a more flexible foreign policy. >> uh-huh. >> so the prognosis so far looks positive because you have these two leadership groups who more or less are willing to accommodate, negotiate, and so forth and so on. but the problem in asia, of course, is that you have some very stubborn views. in the countries, japan, korea, vietnam, philippines, they're all disputing these islands, and it can get out of control. >> tom: mark, how long have you been investing in china or looking at chi for capital? >> it has been over 30 years. >> tom: how would you describe today's opportunity over the course of that generation of vistain investing time? >> it is incredible. ever day you see opportunities in china. the demand for services, for products, you name it. they hunger for all of these things, and they will increase. it will not decrease, because of the wages going up. >> tom: we will have more of our conversation with mark mobius next week on thanksgiving night. he tells us globalization has made the u.s. fiscal cliff a worldwide issue for investors. >> susie: that's "nightly bus
in a situation where this administration cannot talk about much and foreign policy whatsoever. congressman, you get the last word on this. >> on the president obama credit for being able to do one thing that i have not seen in the time that i know him, which is to get senator graham as upset as i have never seen him about anything. and he punches above its weight class. he is engaged on benghazi. kelly ayotte, john mccain, jason chivers, some of us are young enough that we will be around matter how much they want to store mall. we will be around to get the answers, especially for the families of those four murdered americans. lou: coppersmith, we appreciate you being here and your efforts are congressman trey gowdy. >> thank you. lou: much more on benghazi, and the testimony of general petraeus later in this broadcast. negotiations about the fiscal cliff. partisan rhetoric is rampant. can this president and these leaders really reach a deal? acclimate ron christie join us in moments. final resolution. the deadly bp oil spill results in record fines and multiple criminal charges. we will have t
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
an article calling the other fiscal cliff as foreign policy. the shake up on the foreign relations committees -- three of the chair and a ranking member being gone but if senator kerry would move positions it would be a complete clean slate on how often set aside and wondering how it affects the president's ability to build up the top line foreign policy issues, like syria and iran, but also others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber duckie on the catalog today. it helps pay our salaries. >> i think bob corker will be interesting as ranking member on foreign relations. he skipped the republican convention this summer to go to the middle east. and he has been doing a lot of traveling. he is super smart about these kinds of things. i think he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely, like dick lugar, honestly. he will be against the hawks i think on a number of occasions. we did a story recently about him and we had john mccain talk about how much -- how much he respected and although they did not always see eye to eye. but i think the foreign relations panel in both chamber
, 20 individuals with long experience in the intelligence foreign policy, national security arena, who serve as a sounding word and resource for the director about -- board and resource for the director about issues the agency is facing. we meet quarterly. leon panetta started this. general petraeus carried ton. we review a variety of issues and offer our thoughts to the direct quor for whatever they are worth. host: let's move on to, then, the fiscal issue. the so-called fiscal cliff. lots of stories in the papers today that president obama's meeting with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not change entitlements. no cuts to medicare and social security. do you agree? guest: i think some adjustments are going to have to be made. social security today is a lot different than it was when franklin roosevelt first instituted it. it's not as if it's etched in stone. that said, it's got to be a balanced approach. i think that's what the president is going to say. the two actually save the entitlement programs the nation is on the road to bankruptcy, to save them we have to m
. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening now, a dangerous new foreign policy challenge for president obama as word comes that iranian fighter jets have fired -- fired on an unarmed u.s. drone over the persian gulf. you know all about the rallies and political ads, but you'll be surprised to learn how much the obama campaign knew about you. how data mining and number crunching helped re-elect the president. and it may sound strange, but there's already some buzz out there about the next presidential election. we're going to hear about potential candidates for 2016. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama scored a pretty convincing re-election. the president has four more years to pursue his agenda. what can he actually accomplish? john king is joining us now. he's got major challenges and what's on his mind obviously is what's good for the country and his historic legacy. >> you talk about the l word, legacy, whenever someone's re-elected. a closely divided congress, a republican ho
consumption led growth model. >> and is it going to comatethe perhaps its biggest and foreign policy challenge will be the middle east, is going to potentially be iran? >> absolutely. what can we do make them be more constructive there, not support iran, but to lead to a change there. >> phil, thanks for that. he's written loads of books. let's show where you we stand with the u.s. futures right now ahead of this particular market. right new pretty flat the open for the s&p 500. the nasdaq is around five points above fair value and at the moment, we are five points below fair value for the dow. so looks fairly flat. european stocks down most of the session. bond yeeds certainyields certai looking at. >> if we look at the bond space, we can get a sense of why the italian ten year, this is the one to watch breaching the 5% level today. it has come down a little bit from the session high. perhaps indicating something of a floor below the market levels that we're seeing this morning. but certainly one to watch as we continue to gauge fallout across the eurozone as to whether greece ahead of budget
, and foreign policy, embracing each one of those. what we had was one wobbly leg. with $1 billion provided on the republican side. from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas are mandated and created and there is a residence on the ground -- grass-roots level brings public policy leaders into office so those three areas can be implemented without fully engaging on aid to those areas and on social policy, we leave boats on the -- votes on the table every single time. we had a defect a truce on social issues on one side but the full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. republicans had the truth, obama had launched a war over abortion. and on the life issue. and he got to define what that issue was and what is it? rape. abortion meant rape in the minds of many voters because the debate was not fully engaged. his weaknesses, his extreme positions on late term abortions, on sex selection abortion, not saving children born after a failed abortion, none of these were exp
administration foreign policy. do you see anywhere in the world where we are better off or where we are viewed as a stronger, more powerful nation than we were when barack obama first took office? >> absolutely to the contrary. the fact of the matter is, when america has very strong leadership, the world is a safer and a better place. when american leadership is indecisive or paralyzed by fear of consequence, which we have had a lot of, the world is a much more dangerous place. that's what you get from our allies in the region, particularly in those areas where our values and our national interests are being contested as they are in the middle-east. they all fundamentally believe the united states policy is to pull away from them and to disengage. they are terrified by the prospects of an advancing iran, and an advancing al qaeda and affiliated groups with a weakened united states, as a player. >> when you look at the issue of nuclear proliferation, as well, ambassador, iran is a concern. but you look across the region and the extent to which you will have other nations, clearly attempting to
for our foreign policy with iran? joining me fox news middle east analyst, walid phares. thanks for coming back on the show. >> sure. melissa: i have a lot of questions about this. let's start with that, shooting down our drone. does that mean that they have better intelligence about where we are and what we're doing and, i don't know, does that concern you? >> that basically, let me understand that the iranian military and intelligence are following our moves inside the area, the gulf, you know, used to be in iraq before they were spying on our activities but across the persian gulf. this shooting down of a drone is a message of attempt for intimidation of the obama administration because iranian leadership knows that the next step of this renewed administration is to try to sit down with them or with a third party and try to negotiate. so they want to position themselves in a stronger position. melissa: so do you think, i mean, that's what we heard before the election, the president was ready to sit down and have one-on-one negotiations with ahmadinejad. do you see that going forward now
kerry obviously seen as a potential contender for that lot because of his work in the senate on foreign policy in those issues. for right now it looks like rice is much closer to getting the nod. connell: the issues that will come up. benghazi is one of them. the impact does will have on the president's decisions. >> in absolutely the fiscal cliff. issues about the inspiring tax cuts, sequestration, the impact. there ben vaults for years. some will be likely to walk away. leon panetta has been very vocal about his concerns about health sequestration could impact that pentagon. because of that, that will keep him in place. >> that would beecher defense secretary leon panetta. he has fought hard against sequestration because he did not want to see the types of cuts that sequestration calls for for the defense department. he is going to see that through. >> keep in mind, he probably has the toughest and most expensive commute which taxpayers are paying for going back and forth between the east and west coast. a tidbit, i have, excellent researchers here at polk fox news. on average in the
. she's the one -- she's a very talented diplomat. skilled foreign policy. she's been doing this for awhile. very well respected in the industry. suddenly she gets on tv, the administration -- she has a trusted face. she's given this from c.i.a. so the white house has said, what the c.i.a. has said and you know, it points to the video. that's what they had at the time. it is proven to be mostly false. there is -- clear bit of planning going on before that. but you know, so there is probably more upset than susan rice herself. and you know, you have the story of this -- she can't be nominated. for secretary of state or if you did, we would filibuster it but not using the word filibuster because that would be obstructionist. everything in our power. not going to use the magic word to actually stop it. >> john: they don't have to. they're very good at it and democrats let them. number one with the video. our embassy was attacked over that video. our embassy in cairo. and the american flag was torn down a fe
on some of the foreign-policy stuffy has espoused and may disagree with him on that, and that's fine, but he engages you in a debate of ideas around some really strong principles, like the constitution. ron paul will estimate bridget still be a strong player. his son will be a very important voice in the next year or so. i get it. my style is not necessarily the warmest for some conservatives who like the it straight laced stand in the background. i thought of the chairmanship needed to be a vibrant part of the political process. that meant putting it out on the street. that meant doing some shows that were not necessarily traditional for the rnc chairman to do. i just felt very strongly, and i still do, that the power does not rest down here but arrests out in america in the streets. you saw this happen again in this election. it was all race centralized back in washington because we will tell you how to do it because we know best. the reason they hired me was to come in and break that up. some did not like that, whoever else down in other parts of the country and that's fine. the g
with mitt romney, governor romney for not mentioning it. and the third debate on foreign policy, he didn't mention veterans one time and in his 45-minute acceptance speech. but what's important is now that that election is over, craig, we need to come together as americans, democrats and republicans. to do all we can to help these public/private partnerships to be there for these heroes. craig, as you know, it's less than 1% of americans have served in iraq or afghanistan. and over, almost 500,000 of them, suffer from post traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury. that's the signature wound of these wars. we need to learn the lessons from world war ii, from korea, from vietnam. from desert storm that we're going to do all we can as a nation to take care of these heroes when they come home. >> congressman, i want to go inside the campaign for a few moments here before i let you go. there's the, there's a report today in "the wall street journal" i want to throw up a full screen here, it describes the negative attacks that the obama campaign ran early on. it describes them as pa
gets this foreign policy team together for a second term, not to mention the fact he would rather be focusing now on the fiscal cliff. >> and he is having a news conference tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. eastern from the white house. he is going to be bombarded with questions on this. not exactly the way he wanted to start that news conference, i am sure. thanks very much, gloria. >> sure. >>> she's the florida woman described by one source as bored, a bored, rich socialite. now jill kelley is caught up in this widening scandal. i will ask the head of the intelligence committee, dianne feinstein what she knows about this woman. my interview with senator feinstein next. >> her name has come into question, let me put it that way. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. but lately she's been coming in with less gray than usual. what's she up to? [ female announcer ]
a foreign policy legacy that he didn't have the political capital to do in his first term. if i were the obama administration, i would appoint bill clinton as a middle east peace envoy. he has credibility both on the israeli street and in the arab world with the camp david accord s and with the clinton global initiative. we, as americans, the united nations has to get involved. we have to send a message to both israel and palestine that there's absolutely no military violence solution to the israeli/palestinian conflict. it can only be a peaceful and political one. >>> today's talk back question, should [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. . >>> now is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. the question for you this morning, should politicians have a mandatory retirement age? it was a simple question, if you're 27. or maybe those over 50 are way too sensiti
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